Wisconsin Hot Rod Radio is very fortunate to have Al bring his talents to the show. So listen every week to the Modelers Corner with Al Stout. This segment is for the novice as well as the experts.

Al Stout has been building for over 50 years and has been a member of the Auto Modelers Group for over 17 years. And his wife and lovely dove - Kathy - has been building sparingly for the past 10 years.

Al began working on full size automobiles when he was 15 years old when he built a 1951 Ford show car. After graduating high school and then technical school Al spent 25 years painting automobiles with his own body shop.  During this time he did show cars for other people, including having one on a cover of a ‘70s Super Chevy magazine.

During this time he continued to work on smaller scale projects. Models.

He continues today with building models at a fierce pace. Throughout his participations in many of the local and national model shows he has earned the admiration of the other builders. He is constantly working on perfecting the correct representation of the full scale car. Continuously developing new techniques and improving on old ones.

Al and Kathy have been involved with area modelers clubs, seminars and shows. They have contributed to area modelers newsletters. They have presented and demonstrated their techniques to all levels of modeler’s skill levels. And they continue to contribute their models into competitions.

In addition, Al has been commissioned to replicate many of the cool full scale cars. “It is an amazing thing to see your hot rod shrunk down. And even more amazing is that every detail is there” says Arlo Dillman, whose wife asked Al to replicate his severely modified ‘41 Ford “He even created the one-of-a-kind monster dash!”

If you would like to ask Al a question or make a comment please send it to:
comments@wisconsinhotrodradio.com




Check out Season 1!
Introduction to model building by creating a 1949 Ford project car.

Click here for all of Season 1's Tips!

Tip of the Week - You can listen to Al every Saturday morning or go to WHRR past shows.

Send your questions to Al by emailing him at alstout@wisconsinhotrodradio.com.


 
   

TIP #17, Season 2; WHITE WALL TIRES, AIRED 3/23/13


WHITE WALL TIRES

We will start with materials needed: flat white acrylic paint, distilled water, lacquer thinner, air brush, white Gel pen, dry transfers & artist circle template. 

Start out by cleaning tires with lacquer thinner on a damp rag.  For wide white walls you will mix 4 parts of distilled water & one part of white acrylic paint, to be sprayed thru an airbrush at 30lbs. air pressure.  Now you want to place an artist template on the outer ring of the tire sidewall.  Press down firmly & airbrush two coats of acrylic paint on.  Air brushing will not look correct, but will flow out nicely.  Be sure to wash off both sides of the template in between each tire.  If you are not happy with the outcome, you can wash off with soap & water using an old toothbrush.  Very important to clean air brush with soap and water, followed with lacquer thinner.    

Now for brush painting wide white walls, this one part paint with two parts distilled water.  Carefully brush around inner ring of tire until covered.    

Using the Gel pen & an artist template, we will make narrow white walls.  Lay the template on the inside edge of the ring of the tire and carefully run Gel pen around the inside edge of the template.  If you’re not satisfied with the out- come you can wash off with lacquer thinner.    
Raised letters on tires can be painted with acrylic paint.  Good magnification is necessary.  Do one letter at a time, using a fine 10 backslash 0 paintbrush.  Hand lettering is tedious, take a break every so often.  Give your eyes & hands a rest.  If you mess up, it can be removed with lacquer thinner or rubbing alcohol.

If hand lettering isn’t your thing, you can use dry transfers.  They come in white walls, wide and thin, red lines and with race tire markings.  To apply dry-transfer markings or sidewalls, simply cut the graphic off the sheet, position it over the tire, and burnish it into place.  A burnishing tool would be a ballpoint pen, or the butt end of a small paintbrush, these work best for rubbing down the transfer.  This may take some practice.


Tip #16, Season 2; Roll & Pleat Trim Panels AIRED 3/16/13


ROLL & PLEAT TRIM PANELS


Last week, we did roll & pleated seats.  Today we are going to do the trim panels.  First, measure the location of the window cranks, door handles and arm rest.  Using a single edge razor blade, carefully shave off the door handles, window cranks & arm rest.  Cut them deep enough so you can get the complete handles, cranks, etc. off.  Don’t be concerned about damaging the panel, it will be covered up with the pleats. 
 Now carefully, remove any excess plastic from your window cranks, arm rest and door handles with a file.  These will have to be handled very carefully, so you do not break them.

 After all excess plastic is removed, place the pieces on a strip of masking tape with the sticky side up.  This is a safe way to store them, and they can be painted at this time.  Next we will be glueing pleats on your trim panels.

Start at the rear of the door with your 1st pleat, run your pleats vertical.  Continue to the front of the door.  Now leave a 1/32nd gap and start your kick panel.  To do your rear trim panel leave 1/32nd gap between door panel and rear trim panel and run your pleats.  After your seats and side panels have been pleated, spray 2 coats T235 PlastiKote sandable primer.  Let this dry overnight.  Then spray Dupli-Color flat black and your interior is done.  A nicely detailed dash would finish off your project.


Tip #15, Season 2, Roll and Pleat Interiors, AIRED 03/-9/13

Roll and Pleat Interiors.

Roll and Pleat Interiors have never gone out of style. You will see them in customs and street rods of today and nostalgic rods. Get ideas for your interior from magazines, Internet or going to car shows. This tip is for the Advanced Modeler.

To get started you will need these materials; Testors Plastic Cement, brush, Evergreen Plastic half round no. 219, a chopper by Northwest Short Line part 49-4 or make your own jig for cutting pleats.

Start by measuring your front seat from side to side – to find the middle of the seat. Next measure from the back of the bottom seat to the front. This will be the length of your pleats. Bevel each pleat with a file in the front. Using Testors glue, start your first pleat at your center line, make sure it’s straight. Glue the back half of your pleat at your pleat and clamp with a pinch clothespin. Let dry for 20 minutes. After it is dry, glue the front half.  The reason for gluing ½ at a time is there is an arch in the seat. Clamping the front and the rear at the same time does not work well. After your center piece is glued in, glue pleats right and left of the center pleat until you have reached the edge of the seat. Use the same technique for the back seat.

After all your pleats are glued in, round the corners of the outside edge of the pleat with a file. With the beading rod No. 219 – use Testors Plastic Glue at the back outside edge, in the crevice of the seat. Work around your pleats. Glue a small section at a time. Your seats are done.


Tip #14, Season 2; Wood Graining AIRED 3/2/13

HOW TO DO WOODGRAIN ON PLASTIC

Most scale modelers like to create the most detailed models possible. Because most models today are made of plastic, simulating different surfaces can be difficult. Fortunately, simulating wood grains with paint is fairly easy. You can achieve the look with acrylic paints.  In addition, the technique only takes a few minutes for each of two coats of paint, although you will need to allow overnight for the first coat to dry.
The items needed to do your project will be soap and water, lacquer primer, masking tape, acrylic paints, wide flat paint brush and clear lacquer.

First, wash all the parts with dish soap and water.  Prime all the parts with lacquer primer PlastiKote T235, giving them two coats.  It is not necessary to sand.  Mask off area to be done in wood grain.  Then I use Folk Art Tan, but you can use any light color, brushing it to cover the complete area.  This will be your undercoat.  Let this dry overnight.

Next you will dry brush on Burnt Umber to stimulate wood grain.  You can use other acrylic paints and colors .  Dry brushing is done by putting a darker paint on the brush tip and wiping off most of the paint onto a rag or pallet.  Then with little paint left on the brush, apply it over the tan, dragging the brush in the same direction, so you can still see a little of the tan on the model. 
If you are not satisfied, you can wash off the paint with soap and water and try again.  But if you are satisfied with the look of the wood graining, spray two light coats of Testors clear lacquer over it. 

You can experiment with different tones of colors to get the look of the type of wood effect you are after.

Adding bare metal foil to the rails can make a pickup box floor look realistic.  You can wood grain pickup box floors, steak beds and the dash in older model cars.
When you are looking for acrylic paints, you can try Michaels Craft Stores, Jo-Ann Fabrics, Artist supply stores, some hardware and discount stores.


Tip #13, Season 2; Tinting Windows  AIRED 2/23/13


Tinting Window Glass


There are three ways to tint glass on models.  But first clean glass with dish soap and water using a non-abrasive cloth.  Make sure glass is clean; free of dirt, lint, etc.

The first technique we will use Tamiya Smoke No.TS-71. 

Spray four very thin coats on the inside of your glass with 10 minutes between coats, this will give a light tint to your glass.  For a darker tint, spray 6 coats.  Remember, spray very thin or it will run easily.  Polishing the outside of the glass will make it look better. 

The second way to tint glass, is using Mylar shade material.  You can get small cut-off pieces free or very cheap from a shade shop.  The Mylar can only be used on straight glass.  It does not make curves on glass.  Make a template of your glass out of paper first, then transfer it onto your Mylar.  You can glue your windows in with white glue or very carefully with super glue.

The third technique is to spray Testors Candy Apple Red can No.1607 or any other candy colors.  Spray three very light coats of any candy color you choose.  Then follow with a non-abrasive soft cloth to polish the outside of the glass.  The advantage of using Testors over Tamiya paint, is it can be stripped.  Reason being, Testors is an Enamel paint.


Tip #12, Season 2; Cleaning Air Brush  AIRED 2/16/13


Cleaning an Air Brush

One of the most important factors that affect the performance of an air brush is cleanliness.  The small passages inside of the airbrush can be blocked easily with dried paint, if your airbrush is not cleaned after each use.

First step is the type of thinner to be used.  Do not use paint thinner like Mineral Spirits.  It will turn your paint and thinner to jelly.  I don’t use my good thinner at $52.00 a gal.  I buy cheap thinner like Rust-Oleum at Ace Hardware for about $21.00 a gal.  You can use any other lacquer thinner but make sure it is not mineral spirits.  Check your local hardware stores for  a cheap lacquer thinner.  Lacquer thinner will work on cleaning lacquer and enamel paint. 

Next step is to clean paint from the airbrush bottle

(1).  After the bottle is clean, use a pipe cleaner to clean the inside of the siphon tube

(2) and wipe the outside with a lacquer thinner dampened rag

(3).  Remove spray head and clean with a soft bristle brush

(4).  Follow this step by removing the needle from the airbrush

(5) and wiping with the same damp rag

(6).   On the top there is a vent hole, make sure this is open, clean with a bristle brush, if necessary.  Clean the under side of the lid with your bristle brush

(7).  Reassemble your airbrush and spray thinner thru the airbrush into a clean rag until you don’t see any color. Now take a soft cloth and cover the airbrush head and pull the trigger.  This will cause bubbling in the jar

(8).  Repeating this should be done several times.  If the thinner in the jar is clean, your airbrush will also be clean.  If the jar is still not clean, you can repeat the previous steps.

Be sure to read the instructions that come with your airbrush.  Some may be a little different in the cleaning process.


Tip #11, Season 2; Decanting Paint AIR 2/9/13
HOW TO DECANT PAINT

1. The definition of decanting paint is “removing paint” from the spray can that will be used in an airbrush.

2.The reason to do decanting is that airbrushing paint does a better job.  It atomizes the paint better, it is thinner with less overspray.  Plus, the paint and thinner are already mixed.

3. Using a No.11 X-acto blade, ream out the hole that is in the head of the spray can to fit a 3/32nd outer diameter aluminum tube into it.  Cut the aluminum tube 2 ½ inches long.  Insert tube into the hole you reamed out on the spray nozzle head.  Super glue outside edges of aluminum tube to the hole.  Let dry, then put nozzle head back onto spray can.  This process can be used for Testors, Dupli-Color, and other spray can companies.  Then shake spray can.

4. To use this, you need to put two pieces of tape over the air brush bottle opening.  Leave a slot in the center.  Place the aluminum tube in the center of the tape slot and spray paint into the bottle.

5. Spray until you think the paint reaches near the top.  It will settle down to less.  You don’t need a full bottle of paint, so don’t try to empty your spray can into the bottle.  The bottle will feel cold from the propellant.  Let it warm up before spraying the paint.

6. Clean the air brush with lacquer thinner.  Spray thinner thru the nozzle with the air brush to clean.  Spray from aluminum tube and from the spray can head.






 


Tip #10, Season 2; Stripping Paint, AIRED 1/25/13
STRIPPING MODEL CARS & PARTS; OLD & NEW PAINT


My favorite stripping solutions are Castrol Super Clean & Dot 3 Brake Fluid (not synthetic).  There is a product called Purple Power, it works, but not as well as Castrol Super Clean.  When you buy brake fluid, read the directions.  If it says NOT to spill on your car finish that is the one you want to buy.  This means it will damage paint and work as a paint stripper. I will talk about the Castrol Super Clean.  The same method will be used for brake fluid.

Use a plastic container, NOT metal, to fill with Castrol Super Clean.  If you use a metal container, the cleaner will eat out the bottom of the container.  But if you are using Brake Fluid you can use a metal container. Your model goes into the Castrol Super Clean so it is covered with the cleaner.  Now place this container into a larger plastic container filled with hot water.  Do not fill the water any higher than the sides of the Castrol Super Clean container.  Cover both containers.  Change hot water every 2 hours, for the first 6 hours.  Then leave it soak for 24 hours.  Warming the Castrol Super Clean the first 6 hours makes it work better.  The chemicals in the Castrol Super Clean seem to work better when warm.

After 24 hours put on heavy rubber gloves and use an old toothbrush to scrub off paint.  If any paint is left on the model, repeat with hot water again and let set 3-4 hours.  Then scrub your model again.

Using a paint strainer, pour leftover stripper back into the original Castrol Super Clean container.  Straining the stripper makes it last longer and reusable.

A gallon of Castrol Super Clean is about $5.00-$15.00 at K-Mart,Ace Hardware and auto supply stores.  Brake fluid can be purchased at any discount or auto supply store.  Prices vary,$2.00-$8.00.

Get out those old beat up models and get stripping.


Tip #9, Season 2; Resin Models, Aired  1/12/13
Working with Resin Model Car Parts and Bodies

I will be working with a Jimmy Flintstone model.  A customized 1959 Cadillac, built as a slammer.

The first step is to remove the mold release.  The mold release is used so the model can be removed from the mold easily.  The best method for removing mold release is letting the parts soak in a plastic container for 24 hours.  The solution used, should be a product from POR 15 called Marine Clean.  Other soaking solutions that can be used are Castrol Super Clean or Westley’s White Wall Tire Cleaner. These solutions will damage your hands. I wear heavy rubber gloves when using these solutions and use an old toothbrush for scrubbing parts.   

All cleaning should be done before any model work begins. After 24 hours, dry parts.  Rinse in dish soap and scrub with tooth brush.  Remover flashing from windows, push out flashing with your fingers and use a sanding stick to sand window edge.  If there are any pin holes in the body, fill these with super glue and sand smooth.  Sand the body with 400 grit wet/dry sandpaper using water.  Sand until body is smooth.  For hard to get areas, use a 3-M scuff pad.  A scuff pad is like  plastic steel wool. 

Next, sand an “L Channel” on the inside of the front windshield roof pillars, using a flat X-acto blade.  Do the same on the rear window roof pillars.  Be careful and take your time doing this.  These channels are where your windows are going to sit into.
 Use paper to make templates of front, rear and side windows.  Place the templates on .015” thick clear evergreen plastic.  Use a scissors to cut to correct size.  Spray inside of windows with flat black paint.  Lacquer is the best to use.  Put windows on the side and let dry.

Prime the body with Plastic Kote T-235 sandable primer.  Let dry about 45 minutes.  Sand with 600 wet/dry sandpaper using it wet.  Follow with wet 1000 grit sandpaper.  Paint with your favorite paint of lacquer or enamel.  After paint is dry, glue your windows in using super glue.  Finally glue wheels, tires and grilles in place.  Your slammer model is done.

 

 

 






Tip #8 Season 2 – Aired 01/0513
Topic: Resin Model Cars


Getting Started with Resin Model Car Bodies
I had a person ask why should I use resin bodies and parts? Resin
casters or companies offer bodies and parts that are not made in plastic.
They are already customized with chopped tops, chrome removed, skirts, etc.

You can buy parts like continental kits, fender skirts, hood scoops, etc.
that are not available in plastic. Replacement parts are offered for old
models like bumpers, grilles, and interiors. For models such as AMT, SMP,
MPC, Johan and old promotional models you will find in resin.

There are a lot of resin manufactures out there. Such as; RMR, Replicas
& Minitures Company of Marilyn and Hendrix Manufacturer Company-where
the Teardrop trailer came from for WHRR.

My favorite resin companies are Modelhaus and Jimmy Flintstone.
Modelhaus is online or mail order at; 3480 Traughber Road, Decatur, IL
62521-8800. They carry everything from parts to complete kits. Jimmy
Flintstone is a local resin caster company.

His bodies can be bought at Model Empire or online, also. These will
need a donor kit or you can build them as a slammer. Slammer means
there is no motor, interior and blacked out windows. (A donor kit would
be a plastic model for the interior, engine, tires, etc. I’ll go into donor
kits in the next tip. )

You can use a spray can or your air brush on resin models, just as
you do with plastic. But you get a lot more choices in types and models
to purchase. We will continue next week on how to work with resin.


Tip #7 Season 2 – Aired 12/15/12
Topic: Airbrush and Air Compressor

To continue today with gift ideas for the modeler, we have an Airbrush and Air Compressor to talk about.

I think the best air brush for the model car builder is a single action airbrush that is an “internal” mix. Single action refers to an airbrush that the trigger controls only  the air flow. The amount of material or paint is adjustable by turning the adjustment screw for the needle on the end of the air brush. The single action is easier for applying uniform and even coats of color without any notable shade variation.

There are external mix airbrushes also, this means that air and paint are mixed outside the airbrush. This produces a coarse round spray pattern. Some modelers like this type.
My favorite airbrush is the Badger internal mix, that I paid about $75.00 for, several years ago.

Besides the Badger, there are several other brands to look at, such as the Aztec, Paashe, Master and Iwata. Prices range between $25.00 to $130.00. You can buy these at my favorite hobby shops, as usual they are Model Empire and Greenfield News and Hobby. But you can try Hobby Lobby, Hobby Town and your local hobby shop. Don’t forget the internet and Ebay.

To power your airbrush – you will need an Air Compressor. These come in round, oval or square styles. Manufactures include Badger, Paasche, Testors/Aztex and Iwata. These run between $70.00 to  $300.00.  Air Compressors can be bought at hobby shops, Farm & Fleet, Sears and the Internet.
Get an Air Compressor that puts our 30 PSI and about 1/10th HP. Make sure it has at least a 6 foot cord and an automatic shut off. Some units have suction cup feet to keep it from moving around.

Use your air brush from painting your chassis, bodies and motors, You can use Lacquers and Enamel paint. Paints do have to be thinned to go through the airbrush.
Follow the instructions that come with the airbrush. One recommendation is to reduce paint to spray able viscosity, making it the consistency comparable to 2% milk (using thinner).

Build them – if you got ‘EM! And paint ‘EM now!





Tip #6 Season 2 – Aired 12/08/12
Topic: Hobbyist Gift Ideas

Today, I have a couple more Christmas gift ideas for the modelers.  First, is a Pin Vise and Drill Bits. The second is a Dremel.

A Pin Vise is a miniature drill or twist drill. The vises are in a form of a handle with an adjustable throat or Collet. The vise part uses miniature drills, holding very small drill bits in their adjustable collets. The greatest use of a pin vise in model building is for drilling holes for spark plug wires, antennas, floor shifts, mirrors, etc. The handles also come in a variety of shapes, hexagon, square, round or long and narrow. Square or hexagon shapes stops the vise from rolling off your work surface. Purchase the style and size that best suits your hand grip. You want to be able to be comfortable using it. Prices range from $8.00 to $20.00 for a Pin Vise. Individual drill bits run under $2.00 a piece. A 20 piece set of drill bits are $30.00 to $45.00. I don’t recommend, cause you won’t use them all. They can be purchased at Model Empire at 7116 West Greenfield Ave., West Allis, WI or Greenfield News & Hobby at 6815 West Layton Ave., Greenfield, WI. Check your local hobby shops.

A Cordless Dremel Tool is a handy tool for model building. They come in different sizes, so find one that fits your hand, but small enough to use on models. Usually the mini version is best to use.  The Dremel I use is a battery  operated, 4.8 volt. I don’t like the electric because the cord seems to get in the way, plus the electric tool is heavier. But there are advantages of the electric Dremel, it has more power and usually it is variable speed so it doesn’t run out of power. A basic Dremel sells for $20.00, but there is no charger or tools with it.



This is good if your Dremel stops working, but your charger is still good and you’ll already have the tools. Battery Dremels with basic tools and chargers start at $35.00. A deluxe Dremel with case and a large assortment of tools sell upward of $150.00. You can buy Dremels at hobby shops, hardware stores, Farm & Fleet, Wal-Mart and online.

I use my Dremel for roughting out to remove the door handles and chrome moldings and finishing with a sanding stick. The drum barrel can be used to radius wheel wells,and cut off wheels are good for cutting model plastic, aluminum and brass. Use the Dremel on low speed for all the work, the high speed is too fast and melts plastic.


Tip #5 Season 2 Aired 12/01/2012
Topic: Christmas Gift ideas: paint respirator and food dehydrator

First Gift:

The NIOSH approved paint respirator. NIOSH is National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.

Mine is a 3M brand respirator, which is easy to find in stores. Keep the respirator in a plastic when not in use. The filters will last longer and stay clean. And make sure you buy one with replacement filters. Prices are about $35 to $75. Use it for any spray-painting or airbrush-spray can. It will work with any non-catalized paing. However, catalyzed paint should be left to the professionals and in the proper environment.

Second Gift:

A food dehydrator.

This is for the modeler who has almost everything. Use a dehydrator for drying putty, primer, paint, decals and parts after gluing. You can use a dehydrator to warm up spray cans of paint or parts prior to painting.


You can place painted model bodies in the dehydrator - but you must remove it from the paint stand. It may warp the body leaving on the stands.

You should unplug the dehydrator when not in use. And don't put any open containers of paint or flammable thinners inside the dehydrator. You will have to make minor modifications to the units trays to allow taller items to fit such as bodies, interiors. You can use a "spruce" cutter to do the modifications.

Then the only way to adjust the temperature is with sliding the vents on the top. Keep the temperature at 105 to 110 degress. Use a meat thermometer to check the heat.

Prices will very from $19.00 to $100.00 however, the lesser models are better suited for this purpose.


Tip #4 Season 2 Aired 11/19/2012
Topic: A good reference book – “Idea Book of Custom Cars” by Alan Mayes

Today I’m going to talk about a book by Alan Mayes called the Idea Book of Custom Cars. One of the cars on the cover belongs to Voodoo Larry Grobes 1946 Ford.

Some of the cars in the contents are; Pre-war cars, 1949 to 1951 Fords and Mercury’s, show rods, custom front ends and custom rear ends, just to name a few.

A Pre-war car that caught my eye was the 1940 Ford El Matador built in the early sixties by Bill Cushenbery. One of the newer customs built by Oz Customs is a 1940 Mercury. I like it some much, I built a replica model of it. (see photo)

Moving onto the 1949 to 51 Mercury’s; there is a 1950 Ford built in the ‘50s style custom with 57’ Desoto side trim, Oldsmobile grill, fins, etc. One of the famous Barris customs is here also with Bob Hirohata 1951 Mercury.

Chapter 3 is on Cars of the 50’s. Here you will find a 1953 Chevy Coupe by Gary “Chopit” Fioto. And another Barris custom called “Aztec” is a ’55 Chevy.

Moving onto Show Rods with beautiful pictures of the Ala Kart and the Car Craft Dream Rod. The Dream Rod was formerly owned by one of the Auto Modeler’s Group members – Dennis Pallen.

In the Trucks section there is the Rod & Custom Dream Truck and Gene Winfield’s shop truck. Following trucks are a few customs by Bill Hines.

A chapter called “Style & Flow” gives great ideas on the bodies. Peaked hoods, frenched antennas, scoops, sculpting body lines and fins.

There is a chapter  that has “Wheels” in it. Everything from chrome reverse rims to Mickey Thompson’s rader wheels and Caddy Sombrero hubcaps.

Neat ideas on “Front Ends”, ’59 Chevy’s to ’54 Mercury’s and the Shoebox Fords. “Custom Rear Ends” section features a 1953 Chevy with ’56 Packard taillights and a 1959 Caddy taillights in a ’58 Ford.

The section of “Paint & Chrome” has flames, fade a way paint jobs, candy colors, Larry Watson type of scallops, cob webbing and many other paint techniques.

Another feature in the book is “Custom Interiors”. Everything from Mild to Wild.

So if you need ideas for yourself or that hobbyist spouse of yours – this book is for you. Currently the book can be purchased at Greenfield News & Hobby for $24.99.





 Tip #3 Season 2 Aired on 11/17/12
Topic: How to Use Bare Metal Foil
 


In my opinion, nothing makes a model more realistic than adding Bare Metal Foil. Like foiling rocker panel moldings, body side moldings and around front and rear windows.  Foil is not meant to stick to a slick surface, so do not wax your paint job.

The way I use foil is, I put it on a piece of glass. Then I use an exacto knife with a NEW #11 blade and a straight edge for cutting the foil. Cut the foil a little wider and longer than the molding on your model.  Lay the foil on the molding of your model. Starting at one end and burnish  it down with a soft cloth.

After you have it in place, use your thumb nail or a toothpick to adhere it in place., Do this to the foil on the top of your molding and on the bottom. BUT do NOT go beyond your molding because this will make it harder to remove the excess foil.

Now use your exacto knife to cut around the chrome molding and then peel off the excess foil.

The more you do foiling, the better you will get.

The best way to store Bare Metal Foil is to lay flat in a cool area in a plastic bag. You can even store it in the refrigerator. You will not be able to put the foil back on the sheet after it’s been taken off. So make sure you are ready for it. Another trick is that you can polish the foil but don’t try and spray over it to hold it in place.





Tip #2 – Season 2 Aired on 11/10/12
Topic: ALCAD II – Doing your own chrome plating with Alcad.

This is paint that resembles chrome for the advanced modelers.

You cannot hand paint with Alcad. You must use an airbrush. You should start with small parts like valve covers and oil pans. Then work your way up to bumpers and larger parts.

First prepare the part by removing mold lines and injection pin marks. Next prime the part with Lacquer or plastic coat. Sand the primer with 600 grit wet/dry sand paper. Paint the parts using an airbrush using Model Master Classic Black. Mix one part paint with 3 parts lacquer thinner. You want your paint job clean, free of dirt and no orange peel.

The secret of getting a good finish is to do a good job with the primer.

Now is the time to look for filling marks or errors on the building. Examine the quality of the primed surface. If needed – lightly rub down with 1000 grade wet/dry paper or Micromesh. If there are sink or other blemishes on the model you can mask off the affected panel and build up a couple of coats of primer and then sand this level.

When you prime for the Chrome (Alcad II) – make sure that when dry you wipe the gloss black enamel to remove any finger marks because these will show up in the chrome.

Let the black paint dry on week before spraying the Alclad II.

When ready adjust the airbrush to spray a fine mist and set the air pressure at 12-24 lbs.  You should not thin the Alcad II! Spray with two light coats and then let dry for 10 minutes. Gently handle the Alcad II parts or it will rub off. Do not polish! The Alcad II will lose it’s chrome look. Do not clear because it will look like aluminum.

When you are through – clean the airbrush with lacquer thinner for both the paint and the Alclad II.

Alcad II can last up to 4-6 years if proper stored with a tight seal.




Tip #11, Season 2; Wired Distributor AIR 2/02/13
MAKING YOUR OWN WIRED DISTRIBUTOR

An easy way to add detail to a  motor is by adding spark plug wires.  I make my own wired distributors using the model kit distributors.  Start by painting the distributor black.  After it has dried, you will see there is a dot in the center of the bottom on the distributor.  Use this dot as  a guide with a sharp #11 X-acto blade.  You will make a pilot hole for drilling about 1/16th inch deep with the X-acto blade tip.  Then take a 3/32nd inch pin vise drill bit to drill the hole 1/8th inch deep.

Cut 8 spark plug wires 1 ½ inch long.  The wire is cut from Detail Master Precision Model Products 1/25th from the hobby shop.  Take all 8 wires and twist together for 3 quarters of a turn.  Test fit into the hole.  If wires fit, remove them and drop a few drops of super glue in the hole.  Place wires back into hole.  Let dry thoroughly.  Carefully, remove twist to separate 4 wires to the right and 4 wires to the left.  Next glue distributor in place.

The next step is to drill out the spark plug holes in the side of the engine head.  Sometimes the plugs are molded into the head, so you’ll want to cut them off and drill a hole in the same location.  Use a drill bit slightly larger than your plug wires.  When drilling these holes, drill as deep as possible.  The extra depth will give you tolerance into the length of the plug wires.  Now bend the wires down from the distributor and run along the top of the valve covers then down to each hole in the engine block.

If you want a little more realism, you can run a 9th wire from the center of the distributor down to an aftermarket coil.  Spark plug wires can add a lot of difference to making you model more realistic.


Tip #10, Season 2; Stripping Paint, AIRED 1/25/13
STRIPPING MODEL CARS & PARTS; OLD & NEW PAINT


My favorite stripping solutions are Castrol Super Clean & Dot 3 Brake Fluid (not synthetic).  There is a product called Purple Power, it works, but not as well as Castrol Super Clean.  When you buy brake fluid, read the directions.  If it says NOT to spill on your car finish that is the one you want to buy.  This means it will damage paint and work as a paint stripper. I will talk about the Castrol Super Clean.  The same method will be used for brake fluid.

Use a plastic container, NOT metal, to fill with Castrol Super Clean.  If you use a metal container, the cleaner will eat out the bottom of the container.  But if you are using Brake Fluid you can use a metal container. Your model goes into the Castrol Super Clean so it is covered with the cleaner.  Now place this container into a larger plastic container filled with hot water.  Do not fill the water any higher than the sides of the Castrol Super Clean container.  Cover both containers.  Change hot water every 2 hours, for the first 6 hours.  Then leave it soak for 24 hours.  Warming the Castrol Super Clean the first 6 hours makes it work better.  The chemicals in the Castrol Super Clean seem to work better when warm.

After 24 hours put on heavy rubber gloves and use an old toothbrush to scrub off paint.  If any paint is left on the model, repeat with hot water again and let set 3-4 hours.  Then scrub your model again.

Using a paint strainer, pour leftover stripper back into the original Castrol Super Clean container.  Straining the stripper makes it last longer and reusable.

A gallon of Castrol Super Clean is about $5.00-$15.00 at K-Mart,Ace Hardware and auto supply stores.  Brake fluid can be purchased at any discount or auto supply store.  Prices vary,$2.00-$8.00.

Get out those old beat up models and get stripping.


Tip #9, Season 2; Resin Models, Aired  1/12/13
Working with Resin Model Car Parts and Bodies

I will be working with a Jimmy Flintstone model.  A customized 1959 Cadillac, built as a slammer.

The first step is to remove the mold release.  The mold release is used so the model can be removed from the mold easily.  The best method for removing mold release is letting the parts soak in a plastic container for 24 hours.  The solution used, should be a product from POR 15 called Marine Clean.  Other soaking solutions that can be used are Castrol Super Clean or Westley’s White Wall Tire Cleaner. These solutions will damage your hands. I wear heavy rubber gloves when using these solutions and use an old toothbrush for scrubbing parts.   

All cleaning should be done before any model work begins. After 24 hours, dry parts.  Rinse in dish soap and scrub with tooth brush.  Remover flashing from windows, push out flashing with your fingers and use a sanding stick to sand window edge.  If there are any pin holes in the body, fill these with super glue and sand smooth.  Sand the body with 400 grit wet/dry sandpaper using water.  Sand until body is smooth.  For hard to get areas, use a 3-M scuff pad.  A scuff pad is like  plastic steel wool. 

Next, sand an “L Channel” on the inside of the front windshield roof pillars, using a flat X-acto blade.  Do the same on the rear window roof pillars.  Be careful and take your time doing this.  These channels are where your windows are going to sit into.
 Use paper to make templates of front, rear and side windows.  Place the templates on .015” thick clear evergreen plastic.  Use a scissors to cut to correct size.  Spray inside of windows with flat black paint.  Lacquer is the best to use.  Put windows on the side and let dry.

Prime the body with Plastic Kote T-235 sandable primer.  Let dry about 45 minutes.  Sand with 600 wet/dry sandpaper using it wet.  Follow with wet 1000 grit sandpaper.  Paint with your favorite paint of lacquer or enamel.  After paint is dry, glue your windows in using super glue.  Finally glue wheels, tires and grilles in place.  Your slammer model is done.

 

 

 






Tip #8 Season 2 – Aired 01/0513
Topic: Resin Model Cars


Getting Started with Resin Model Car Bodies
I had a person ask why should I use resin bodies and parts? Resin
casters or companies offer bodies and parts that are not made in plastic.
They are already customized with chopped tops, chrome removed, skirts, etc.

You can buy parts like continental kits, fender skirts, hood scoops, etc.
that are not available in plastic. Replacement parts are offered for old
models like bumpers, grilles, and interiors. For models such as AMT, SMP,
MPC, Johan and old promotional models you will find in resin.

There are a lot of resin manufactures out there. Such as; RMR, Replicas
& Minitures Company of Marilyn and Hendrix Manufacturer Company-where
the Teardrop trailer came from for WHRR.

My favorite resin companies are Modelhaus and Jimmy Flintstone.
Modelhaus is online or mail order at; 3480 Traughber Road, Decatur, IL
62521-8800. They carry everything from parts to complete kits. Jimmy
Flintstone is a local resin caster company.

His bodies can be bought at Model Empire or online, also. These will
need a donor kit or you can build them as a slammer. Slammer means
there is no motor, interior and blacked out windows. (A donor kit would
be a plastic model for the interior, engine, tires, etc. I’ll go into donor
kits in the next tip. )

You can use a spray can or your air brush on resin models, just as
you do with plastic. But you get a lot more choices in types and models
to purchase. We will continue next week on how to work with resin.


Tip #7 Season 2 – Aired 12/15/12
Topic: Airbrush and Air Compressor

To continue today with gift ideas for the modeler, we have an Airbrush and Air Compressor to talk about.

I think the best air brush for the model car builder is a single action airbrush that is an “internal” mix. Single action refers to an airbrush that the trigger controls only  the air flow. The amount of material or paint is adjustable by turning the adjustment screw for the needle on the end of the air brush. The single action is easier for applying uniform and even coats of color without any notable shade variation.

There are external mix airbrushes also, this means that air and paint are mixed outside the airbrush. This produces a coarse round spray pattern. Some modelers like this type.
My favorite airbrush is the Badger internal mix, that I paid about $75.00 for, several years ago.

Besides the Badger, there are several other brands to look at, such as the Aztec, Paashe, Master and Iwata. Prices range between $25.00 to $130.00. You can buy these at my favorite hobby shops, as usual they are Model Empire and Greenfield News and Hobby. But you can try Hobby Lobby, Hobby Town and your local hobby shop. Don’t forget the internet and Ebay.

To power your airbrush – you will need an Air Compressor. These come in round, oval or square styles. Manufactures include Badger, Paasche, Testors/Aztex and Iwata. These run between $70.00 to  $300.00.  Air Compressors can be bought at hobby shops, Farm & Fleet, Sears and the Internet.
Get an Air Compressor that puts our 30 PSI and about 1/10th HP. Make sure it has at least a 6 foot cord and an automatic shut off. Some units have suction cup feet to keep it from moving around.

Use your air brush from painting your chassis, bodies and motors, You can use Lacquers and Enamel paint. Paints do have to be thinned to go through the airbrush.
Follow the instructions that come with the airbrush. One recommendation is to reduce paint to spray able viscosity, making it the consistency comparable to 2% milk (using thinner).

Build them – if you got ‘EM! And paint ‘EM now!





Tip #6 Season 2 – Aired 12/08/12
Topic: Hobbyist Gift Ideas

Today, I have a couple more Christmas gift ideas for the modelers.  First, is a Pin Vise and Drill Bits. The second is a Dremel.

A Pin Vise is a miniature drill or twist drill. The vises are in a form of a handle with an adjustable throat or Collet. The vise part uses miniature drills, holding very small drill bits in their adjustable collets. The greatest use of a pin vise in model building is for drilling holes for spark plug wires, antennas, floor shifts, mirrors, etc. The handles also come in a variety of shapes, hexagon, square, round or long and narrow. Square or hexagon shapes stops the vise from rolling off your work surface. Purchase the style and size that best suits your hand grip. You want to be able to be comfortable using it. Prices range from $8.00 to $20.00 for a Pin Vise. Individual drill bits run under $2.00 a piece. A 20 piece set of drill bits are $30.00 to $45.00. I don’t recommend, cause you won’t use them all. They can be purchased at Model Empire at 7116 West Greenfield Ave., West Allis, WI or Greenfield News & Hobby at 6815 West Layton Ave., Greenfield, WI. Check your local hobby shops.

A Cordless Dremel Tool is a handy tool for model building. They come in different sizes, so find one that fits your hand, but small enough to use on models. Usually the mini version is best to use.  The Dremel I use is a battery  operated, 4.8 volt. I don’t like the electric because the cord seems to get in the way, plus the electric tool is heavier. But there are advantages of the electric Dremel, it has more power and usually it is variable speed so it doesn’t run out of power. A basic Dremel sells for $20.00, but there is no charger or tools with it.



This is good if your Dremel stops working, but your charger is still good and you’ll already have the tools. Battery Dremels with basic tools and chargers start at $35.00. A deluxe Dremel with case and a large assortment of tools sell upward of $150.00. You can buy Dremels at hobby shops, hardware stores, Farm & Fleet, Wal-Mart and online.

I use my Dremel for roughting out to remove the door handles and chrome moldings and finishing with a sanding stick. The drum barrel can be used to radius wheel wells,and cut off wheels are good for cutting model plastic, aluminum and brass. Use the Dremel on low speed for all the work, the high speed is too fast and melts plastic.


Tip #5 Season 2 Aired 12/01/2012
Topic: Christmas Gift ideas: paint respirator and food dehydrator

First Gift:

The NIOSH approved paint respirator. NIOSH is National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.

Mine is a 3M brand respirator, which is easy to find in stores. Keep the respirator in a plastic when not in use. The filters will last longer and stay clean. And make sure you buy one with replacement filters. Prices are about $35 to $75. Use it for any spray-painting or airbrush-spray can. It will work with any non-catalized paing. However, catalyzed paint should be left to the professionals and in the proper environment.

Second Gift:

A food dehydrator.

This is for the modeler who has almost everything. Use a dehydrator for drying putty, primer, paint, decals and parts after gluing. You can use a dehydrator to warm up spray cans of paint or parts prior to painting.


You can place painted model bodies in the dehydrator - but you must remove it from the paint stand. It may warp the body leaving on the stands.

You should unplug the dehydrator when not in use. And don't put any open containers of paint or flammable thinners inside the dehydrator. You will have to make minor modifications to the units trays to allow taller items to fit such as bodies, interiors. You can use a "spruce" cutter to do the modifications.

Then the only way to adjust the temperature is with sliding the vents on the top. Keep the temperature at 105 to 110 degress. Use a meat thermometer to check the heat.

Prices will very from $19.00 to $100.00 however, the lesser models are better suited for this purpose.


Tip #4 Season 2 Aired 11/19/2012
Topic: A good reference book – “Idea Book of Custom Cars” by Alan Mayes

Today I’m going to talk about a book by Alan Mayes called the Idea Book of Custom Cars. One of the cars on the cover belongs to Voodoo Larry Grobes 1946 Ford.

Some of the cars in the contents are; Pre-war cars, 1949 to 1951 Fords and Mercury’s, show rods, custom front ends and custom rear ends, just to name a few.

A Pre-war car that caught my eye was the 1940 Ford El Matador built in the early sixties by Bill Cushenbery. One of the newer customs built by Oz Customs is a 1940 Mercury. I like it some much, I built a replica model of it. (see photo)

Moving onto the 1949 to 51 Mercury’s; there is a 1950 Ford built in the ‘50s style custom with 57’ Desoto side trim, Oldsmobile grill, fins, etc. One of the famous Barris customs is here also with Bob Hirohata 1951 Mercury.

Chapter 3 is on Cars of the 50’s. Here you will find a 1953 Chevy Coupe by Gary “Chopit” Fioto. And another Barris custom called “Aztec” is a ’55 Chevy.

Moving onto Show Rods with beautiful pictures of the Ala Kart and the Car Craft Dream Rod. The Dream Rod was formerly owned by one of the Auto Modeler’s Group members – Dennis Pallen.

In the Trucks section there is the Rod & Custom Dream Truck and Gene Winfield’s shop truck. Following trucks are a few customs by Bill Hines.

A chapter called “Style & Flow” gives great ideas on the bodies. Peaked hoods, frenched antennas, scoops, sculpting body lines and fins.

There is a chapter  that has “Wheels” in it. Everything from chrome reverse rims to Mickey Thompson’s rader wheels and Caddy Sombrero hubcaps.

Neat ideas on “Front Ends”, ’59 Chevy’s to ’54 Mercury’s and the Shoebox Fords. “Custom Rear Ends” section features a 1953 Chevy with ’56 Packard taillights and a 1959 Caddy taillights in a ’58 Ford.

The section of “Paint & Chrome” has flames, fade a way paint jobs, candy colors, Larry Watson type of scallops, cob webbing and many other paint techniques.

Another feature in the book is “Custom Interiors”. Everything from Mild to Wild.

So if you need ideas for yourself or that hobbyist spouse of yours – this book is for you. Currently the book can be purchased at Greenfield News & Hobby for $24.99.





 Tip #3 Season 2 Aired on 11/17/12
Topic: How to Use Bare Metal Foil
 


In my opinion, nothing makes a model more realistic than adding Bare Metal Foil. Like foiling rocker panel moldings, body side moldings and around front and rear windows.  Foil is not meant to stick to a slick surface, so do not wax your paint job.

The way I use foil is, I put it on a piece of glass. Then I use an exacto knife with a NEW #11 blade and a straight edge for cutting the foil. Cut the foil a little wider and longer than the molding on your model.  Lay the foil on the molding of your model. Starting at one end and burnish  it down with a soft cloth.

After you have it in place, use your thumb nail or a toothpick to adhere it in place., Do this to the foil on the top of your molding and on the bottom. BUT do NOT go beyond your molding because this will make it harder to remove the excess foil.

Now use your exacto knife to cut around the chrome molding and then peel off the excess foil.

The more you do foiling, the better you will get.

The best way to store Bare Metal Foil is to lay flat in a cool area in a plastic bag. You can even store it in the refrigerator. You will not be able to put the foil back on the sheet after it’s been taken off. So make sure you are ready for it. Another trick is that you can polish the foil but don’t try and spray over it to hold it in place.





Tip #2 – Season 2 Aired on 11/10/12
Topic: ALCAD II – Doing your own chrome plating with Alcad.

This is paint that resembles chrome for the advanced modelers.

You cannot hand paint with Alcad. You must use an airbrush. You should start with small parts like valve covers and oil pans. Then work your way up to bumpers and larger parts.

First prepare the part by removing mold lines and injection pin marks. Next prime the part with Lacquer or plastic coat. Sand the primer with 600 grit wet/dry sand paper. Paint the parts using an airbrush using Model Master Classic Black. Mix one part paint with 3 parts lacquer thinner. You want your paint job clean, free of dirt and no orange peel.

The secret of getting a good finish is to do a good job with the primer.

Now is the time to look for filling marks or errors on the building. Examine the quality of the primed surface. If needed – lightly rub down with 1000 grade wet/dry paper or Micromesh. If there are sink or other blemishes on the model you can mask off the affected panel and build up a couple of coats of primer and then sand this level.

When you prime for the Chrome (Alcad II) – make sure that when dry you wipe the gloss black enamel to remove any finger marks because these will show up in the chrome.

Let the black paint dry on week before spraying the Alclad II.

When ready adjust the airbrush to spray a fine mist and set the air pressure at 12-24 lbs.  You should not thin the Alcad II! Spray with two light coats and then let dry for 10 minutes. Gently handle the Alcad II parts or it will rub off. Do not polish! The Alcad II will lose it’s chrome look. Do not clear because it will look like aluminum.

When you are through – clean the airbrush with lacquer thinner for both the paint and the Alclad II.

Alcad II can last up to 4-6 years if proper stored with a tight seal.




 

 

   
 
 
   
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